Navajo Rugs & Weavings For Sale

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NAVAJO RUGS FOR SALE!!

We specialize in exceptional authentic hand-woven Navajo rug/weavings. Today’s Navajo textiles are individualized works of art to be used primarily as floor rugs & wall hangings. These beautiful works of art are created using virtually the same process that Navajo weavers have used for hundreds of years.
We have a wonderful selection of fine Native American Indian rugs for sale, hand-made by amazingly skilled Navajo weavers. If you have any questions about any of the weavings offered for sale here, you can click on the product description or give us a call.

OUR NAVAJO WEAVINGS

These rugs are all one-of-a-kind, hand-woven works of art. Creating one rug can take a skilled weaving artist months or even years depending on the amount of wool preparation required, the size of the rug, the intricacy of the pattern, and the fineness of the weave. Best estimates establish that Navajo Indians have been weaving these amazing textiles since the mid-late 1600’s. While the process has evolved (only slightly), and the materials used have (only in some ways) evolved as well, each rug remains true to its cultural roots.
These weavings are all made of spun wool. Some of the wools used are completely natural (or a blend of natural wool colors), while others are colored with vegetal (plant) dyes, and some are colored with commercial dyes. Many Navajo weavers still raise their own sheep, shear the sheep, clean the wool, hand-wash the wool, hand-card (blend) and/or hand-dye the wool, and hand-spin the wool before weaving. Some of these weaving artists will simply purchase pre-washed & pre-spun wools before weaving; many of whom actually tear down the purchased wool and re-spin it all to their preferred level of fineness. Many weavers are open to using combinations of both commercially-prepared & hand-prepared wools, both commercially-dyed & hand-dyed wools, within one weaving, or from one rug to another. — Necessary to create an authentic Navajo rug, the weavers still ignore modern technology and weave on upright looms with no moving parts.